EIHPC Logo Slide Image

Our Mission

Our mission is to provide youth with the opportunity to expand their equine knowledge, enhance their horsemanship skills and make new friends.


To contact us call
563.580.6602
563.599.6528
563.543.0064


or email us at
team@eihpc.com
 

 

About the Eastern Iowa Horse & Pony Camp


The annual camp known as, Horse & Pony Camp, began in 1971 with the Dubuque County Trailblazers 4-H Club. In the summer of 2014, it was decided to form a new non-profit organization that would take over the responsibility of managing this summer youth camp. The Eastern Iowa Horse & Pony Camp, Inc. (EIHPC) was formed. Our current members are Rodney Carroll, Matt King, Ben Urbain, Shawn Strief, Sue Manternach, Jessica Hingtgen,  Katie Kotz, Jason Burke, and Nick Meyer. We are honored to carry on the rich tradition and history of the “Old Horse and Pony Camp”.

 

2018-Board-Members.jpg

 

 

Iowa Code Chapter 673
WARNING: Under Iowa law, a domesticated animal professional is not liable for damages suffered by, an injury to, or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of domesticated animal activities, pursuant to Iowa Code Chapter 673.  You are assuming inherent risks of participating in this domesticated animal activity. A number of inherent risks are associated with a domesticated animal activity.  A domesticated animal may behave in a manner that results in damage to property or an injury or death to a person.  Risks associated with the activity may include injuries caused by bucking, biting, stumbling, rearing, trampling, scratching, falling, or butting.  The domesticated animal may react unpredictably to conditions, including, but not limited to, a sudden movement, loud noise, and unfamiliar environment, or the introduction of unfamiliar persons, animals, or objects. The domesticated animal may also react in a dangerous manner when a condition or treatment is considered hazardous to the welfare of the animal; a collision occurs with an object or animal; or a participant fails to exercise reasonable care, take adequate precautions, or use adequate control when engaging in a domesticated animal activity, including failing to maintain reasonable control of the animal or failing to act in a manner consistent with the person’s abilities.


FT
Copyright © 2017 Eastern Iowa Horse & Pony Camp A Solar Pixel Design